Publications
LSNJ Publications

LSNJ publishes a legal education newsletter, Looking Out for Your Legal Rights®, and a series of legal information manuals in English and in Spanish to help you understand the law and your legal rights and responsibilities.

 
LOOKING OUT FOR YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS

View list of previous issues

SELF-HELP MATERIALS
collapse Consequences of Criminal Charges and Convictions ‎ (1 self-help material)
Clearing Your Record - 2012 Edition
This guide provides basic information about how to clear—"expunge"—a record of arrest or conviction in New Jersey. It includes the forms needed for filing. In the limited circumstances where expungement is possible, the process is relatively simple and usually can be managed without the help of a lawyer.

View PDF file in English
collapse Family and Relationships ‎ (4 self-help materials)
Divorce in New Jersey: A Self-Help Guide
Divorce in New Jersey: A Self-Help Guide explains how to file for divorce or dissolve a civil union in New Jersey. You may read the instructions for filing for divorce or dissolution here. The forms and letters for filing are available in the print and digital editions of the manual, available for purchase. If you qualify based on income, you may be eligible for a copy at no charge.

View PDF file in English
Termination of Parental Rights: A Handbook for Parents
LSNJ wrote this handbook to help parents when the Division of Child Protection and Permanency, DCP&P (formerly the Division of Youth and Family Services, DYFS) takes legal action to terminate (end) their parental rights to their children. This handbook contains information about the law and legal process that apply to you as a defendant parent being sued by DCP&P in a termination of parental rights case.

View PDF file in English
collapse Health Care ‎ (2 self-help materials)
New Jersey’s Charity Care Program
​If you are not eligible for Medicaid or NJ FamilyCare, and you do not have other health insurance that will pay all of your hospital costs, you may still be entitled to free or reduced-cost hospital care if you cannot afford it on your own. This handbook will help you understand what to do.

View PDF file in the following languages:

English

Español

collapse Housing ‎ (2 self-help materials)
Tenants' Rights in New Jersey
Tenants' Rights in New Jersey is LSNJ's guide to landlord-tenant law for New Jersey residents. The manual includes chapters on finding a place to live, security deposits, leases, rent increases, the responsibilities of landlords and tenants, legal and illegal evictions, condo and co-op conversions, and the right to safe and decent housing.

View PDF file in the following languages:

English

Español

OTHER INFORMATION (in multiple languages)
collapse Family and Relationships ‎ (1 informational flyer)
View PDF file in the following languages:

English

Español

collapse Government Aid and Services ‎ (7 informational flyers)
View PDF file in the following languages:

English

Español

View PDF file in the following languages:

English

Español

View PDF file in the following languages:

English

collapse Jobs and Employment ‎ (1 informational flyer)
View PDF file in the following languages:

English

Español

collapse Taxes ‎ (1 informational flyer)

 

LSNJ Publications
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Copyright information
Legal Services of New Jersey makes these publications available for use by low-income people and their advocates who provide not-for-profit legal help for low-income people. All of our publications are copyrighted. Permission is granted for personal use only. They may not be sold or used commercially by others.
Disclaimer
These publications provide general information about the law. They do not provide specific advice about a particular legal problem that you may have, and they are not a substitute for seeing a lawyer at times when you may need one. If in doubt as to whether you need a lawyer, talk to one.